HISTORY  |  Elawa Farm was the country
estate of A. Watson Armour and his wife Elsa (the
name deriving from the first initials of both names
EL-A-WA), members of one of Chicago’s oldest
and most distinguished families (Armour & Co.
meat packing firm). Renown Chicago architect
David Adler designed the Gatehouses as a
weekend retreat for the family circa 1917. When
plans for a main house were never realized, wings
were added to both Gatehouses. A tunnel between
the Gatehouses was constructed in 1936 to allow
family members easy access in bad weather.

Learn more about Elawa Farm
Learn more about Paul Klug Inc. Interior Design
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900 NORTH WAUKEGAN ROAD  |  LAKE FOREST, IL   60045  |  (847) 251-8355
© 2014 CRAIG BERGMANN LANDSCAPE DESIGN, INC.
Residence and Design Offices of Craig Bergmann Landscape Design, Inc. and Paul Klug, Inc.
in the Historic A. Watson Armour Estate designed by architect David Adler
After years of searching for a home where landscape architect Craig Bergmann
and interior designer Paul Klug could enjoy combining their creative forces, they
found the perfect spot - the historic entry complex of the A. Watson Armour
estate at Elawa Farm. Designed by renown architect David Adler, circa 1917,
the two Gatehouses and Coach House complex now houses both living and
working space for the Landscape Design and Interior Design studios.

Restoration of the three buildings has been simultaneous with the creation of
the Garden. The display gardens from the former Craig Bergmann’s Country
Garden (developed over the past 20 years) formed the basis of the Gardens at
900. Future projects include the restoration of the David Adler-designed
garage, the installation of a historic greenhouse salvaged from a David Adler
project in Winnetka, and the interior restoration of the West Gatehouse by Paul
Klug, Inc.

The restoration and rejuvenation of these historic buildings and land is not only
for use today, but, most importantly, they are being preserved for future
generations to appreciate and enjoy.